New social media strategy

Most people who are constant producers of information in social media will now understand that the space is getting crowded with popular services. Where once we had the one blog to update, we now have to dedicate time to facebook, twitter, tumblr and google plus.

This has made me think about my social media strategy. The truth is, I don’t really have one. When this blog started in 2009, the strategy was to produce via this medium and draw interest and attention back to this page. Since then, I’ve joined twitter, created a tumble log, joined linked in and various other services.

I’m now forced to think about how I spend my time on these networks and which ones I chose to contribute to the most. The problem is that they all seem worthwhile and enjoyable. So I will have to prioritise. This is how I think I will do it.

My blog – this blog

This blog will be the space most serious to me. As I pay money to keep this domain every year and have the url printed on my business card, I may as well keep this in good order. I haven’t written here consistently. There are two reasons for this. One is that I’ve been distracted with less meaningful social media services. The other reason is that I’d rather have well thought out posts on this blog, which means that I don’t often have interesting material to share here or it takes some time to write and edit¬†everything¬†in a decent manner. This blog will however become my most important internet presence. Continue reading

My thoughts on Google Buzz

I like the service for 3 reasons:

1) Easy access with little effort

2) Simple to learn and no frills design

3) Adequate compatibility for different publishing mediums (at least in my experience)

The fact that Buzz lives inside your gmail inbox is fantastic. After I’ve checked my emails, Buzz is just one click away. It’s just a matter of opening up the Buzz pane and you can quickly scroll over recent activity. A much simpler task than viewing your RSS reader. And just that one step more convenient than viewing your twitter account. Continue reading

Social Networking for Musicians

Creating an Online Internet Profile (OIP)

For a music band that isn’t connected to a record label, OIP is vital.

The notion that alternative music need not use social networking tools because of pop fads or trends is now outdated. Whether you produce folk music, death hip-hop or political punk rock or even opera, a credible internet presence can do nothing else than enhance your reputation.

Currently the internet is an inexpensive medium that reaches a mass audience of distinct ages and demographics. Being accessible to distant fans can take your success higher than what was possible ten years ago, and this is possible without much budget spent on advertising. Now let’s look at the tools available.

Social Media

The above concept has changed the way we view networking and even critics cannot play down the influence and significance of this trend called web 2.0.

There are more than enough useful applications to use on the internet. While it is advisable to have several appearances or entrance points online, it isn’t necessary to use every one available as maintenance becomes time consuming. It’s best to stick with the most common ones as the audiences there are larger. Now let’s investigate the crucial applications you need to have to create that mass following. Continue reading

Web 2.0 and social networking

With so much internet activity in the last two years, it is easy to fall behind on new trends with regards to social networking and new online exchanges.

I remember going through some of the hype when I was at school when hotmail started to gain popularity. It wasn’t long before instant messaging – icq, msn, yahoo chat rooms – started taking up all the free time of highschool students, not to mention mobile phones and text messaging.

I was in the loop from the beginning but somewhere along the tack I fell out of the loop and now as an adult I have to discover the new fads on my own.

I think that the emergence of facebook has been a real turning point in the way we create meaningful networks on the internet. Continue reading